City of Carmel Proclaims “Net Literacy Week”

Mayor Jim Brainard has proclaimed March 18th to March 24th as “Net Literacy Week” in Carmel, Indiana.

Net Literacy was founded by middle school students attending Carmel Middle School in 2003, and beginning in 2005, students at Carmel High School have repurposed computers after school for more than ten years. On May 18th, Carmel High School’s Net Literacy chapter was recognized by Mayor Brainard and the City of Carmel for repurposing and donating over 5,000 computers. These computers donations have been distributed to community centers, senior centers, public libraries, schools, and K12 families in Carmel and throughout Indiana.

Also, Carmel High School students have assisted hundreds of Carmel residents at senior centers and independent living facilities by teaching them computer, internet, and device skills.  Carmel Clay Schools elementary and middle school students have also helped increased internet safety awareness through in school presentations and by staring in safety PSAs that were scripted by Net Literacy student volunteers and carried on television throughout central Indiana.

Receiving the proclamation were Ethan Welp and Evan Kenyon, two Carmel High School students and Net Literacy volunteers. Also recognized was Carmel Clay Schools teacher Stacie Fowler, who sponsors the Net Literacy club at Carmel High School.

For more information, please contact danielkent (at) netliteracy.org

 

 

 

 

IPS School Board Honors Net Literacy During January 2017 School Board Meeting

January 26, 2017

The IPS School Board honored Net Literacy with a certificate of special recognition for donating 17,000 computers to IPS schools and IPS K-12 families. Also, Net Literacy was recognized for engaging thousands of IPS students as volunteers after school and employing hundreds of IPS students during its annual summer internship programs. For more information, contact danielkent(at)netliteracy.org.

Best Told in Pictures: Net Literacy Student Volunteers Help Senior Citizens Learn to Use Social Media and Their Devices

March 10, 2017

A team of student volunteers visiting an independent living facility to help answer senior’s questions about using their devices and social media as part of the Senior Connects program. It’s best told in pictures. For additional information, email danielkent(at)netliteracy.org

Eskenazi Health’s Donations Helps Increase High School Graduation Rates

Eskenazi Health donated the first 50 of as many as 1000 17″ LCD monitors to Net Literacy today, continuing their long standing program of giving back to the communities that they serve.

“Eskenazi Health’s donation makes a real difference to students and their families,” said Daniel Kent, founder of Net Literacy. “As an independent variable, students with a computer at home are 7% more likely to graduate from high school. Because we have more computers to donate than monitors, Eskenazi Health’s generous donation will enable us to provide increased technology to the homes of up to 1000 K12 families, and according to the statistics, more than 70 additional students may graduate from high school.” Net Literacy also donates computers to afterschool providers, public libraries, community centers, and other nonprofits. “Thank you Eskenazi Health,” Kent continued, “for being such an amazing community partner!”

Eskenazi Health is a leading A leading health care provider in central Indiana, and offers a wide range of services at their 315-bed Indianapolis hospital and 10 community health centers. For more information, visit www.eskenazihealth.edu/

Net Literacy is a digital inclusion and digital literacy nonprofit founded by middle school students in 2003 and has donated 39,000 computers to Hoosiers and nonprofits throughout the Midwest. For more information, visit www.netliteracy.org/about-us.

Net Literacy Donates 890 Computers to 100 Indiana Libraries

Net Literacy was conceived of by a middle school student who was volunteering at a public library teaching elementary school students and senior citizens computer and Internet skills in 2003. Net Literacy’s first training guides and lesson plans were adapted from materials that were donated by the research librarian. Fourteen years later, Net Literacy continues to say “thank you” by giving back to public libraries since they were involved in its genesis, and supports the impact that public libraries play in increasing access to technology and digital literacy throughout Indiana. In total, Net Literacy has donated 890 computers (and monitors, keyboards, mice, and power cords) to the Indiana Library Association who coordinates their distribution across Indiana.

Since its inception, Net Literacy has donated over 39,000 computers to K12 families, community centers, libraries, senior centers, schools, and other nonprofits. K12 students that have a computer at home are 7% more likely to graduate from high school. Net Literacy has used a two prong strategy to maximize access to computers – by donating to schools whose student counselors give the computers to underserved and high need families and to nonprofits so that they can construct, expand, or refresh public computer labs. One of Net Literacy’s initiatives has constructed 135 computer labs in schools, churches, and community centers within the Indianapolis area.

Maricopa County Librarian Scott Sjolin Teaches Digital Literacy Using Net Literacy Lesson Plans

March 2016

Scott Sjolin is the Librarian at Queen Creek Branch of Maricopa County Library District, and he reached out to us asking to use Net Literacy’s lessons plans to teach computer and Internet skills. So far, he has taught three classes using the Computer Basics Lesson Plan, the Internet Basics Lesson Plan, and the Email Basics Lesson Plan – and tells us that the printed lesson plans help instruction process and that the adults he taught appreciated the lesson plans that he provided to each student. He sent us a couple pictures of him in action teaching classes. In behalf of Net Literacy, thanks Scott for teaching computer skills and increasing digital literacy!

Net Literacy, the Mary Riggs Community Center, and IPS Work to Donate an Additional 1050 Computers

Net Literacy, Mary Riggs Community Center, and IPS are working to distribute computers repurposed at Broad Ripple Magnet High School to the families of K12 IPS students and to afterschool programs that support IPS.

“Liz Odel,” said Daniel Kent, “has been leading the charge in facilitating the distribution of computers to dozens of IPS schools.” According to Kent, IPS families have received more than 200 computers last month and 100 have been staged to be transported by IPS Transportation to North West High School. In total, IPS families and afterschool programs have received more than 18,000 computers.

“I’m really pleased that we are able to donate higher end computers to the K12 families,” Kent said. “All of the PCs are dual core machines with 2 to 4 Gig of Ram. They have plenty of horsepower for students to use them to complete their homework Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, and PowerPoint presentations.” Included on the computers is Open Office, and other applications that help students take advantage of their computers for school work.

For more information, email me at danielkent(at)netliteracy.org

Net Literacy Donates 750 Computers to Almost 100 Indiana Public Libraries

Net Literacy was conceived of by a middle school student who was volunteering at a public library teaching elementary school students and senior citizens computer and Internet skills in 2003. Net Literacy’s first training guides and lesson plans were adapted from materials that were donated by the research librarian. Fourteen years later, Net Literacy continues to say “thank you” by giving back to public libraries since they were involved in its genesis, and supports the impact that public libraries play in increasing access to technology and digital literacy throughout Indiana. The picture below is one of me sitting on some of the computers that the Indiana Library Association recently picked up. In total, Net Literacy has donated 750 computers (and monitors, keyboards, mice, and power cords) to the Indiana Library Association who coordinates their distribution across Indiana.

Since its inception, Net Literacy has donated almost 35,000 computers to K12 families, community centers, libraries, senior centers, schools, and other nonprofits. K12 students that have a computer at home are 7% more likely to graduate from high school. Net Literacy has used a two prong strategy to maximize access to computers – by donating to schools whose student counselors give the computers to underserved and high need families and to nonprofits so that they can construct, expand, or refresh public computer labs. One of Net Literacy’s initiatives has constructed 135 computer labs in schools, churches, and community centers within the Indianapolis area.

Dan in warehouse

For more information, contact Daniel Kent at danielkent(at)netliteracy.org

Harshman Middle School Uses Net Literacy Computers to Make STEM Learning Real World and Relevant!

Students in Ms. Caren Lettofsky’s computer science classes, at Indianapolis Public School’s Harshman Middle School, learn about computers by reassemble their own computer.

Ms Lettofsky

First, Ms. Lettofsky first has the students build a virtual computer, using a website created by Cisco. This site walks students through various steps to build a desktop computer. This part of the website gives hints and guidance as to what to do. Once the students has completed this part of the website, the students then move to the next phase of the website and build the computer without any added help. Ms. Lettofsky also has the students complete a worksheet where the students must explain, in their own words, what the various parts of a computer does.

Virtual Computer Assembly Application

Learning then becomes very real for the students. Students, in teams of two, work on computers provided by Net Literacy. First, each team completely disassembles the computer. Then the hard work begins as each team reassembles their computer.

Two students at Harshman

When each team believes they have reassembled the computer correctly, the team presents the reassembled computer to Ms. Lettofsky. The computer is then connected to a keyboard, mouse, and monitor and powered on to make certain that it was correctly reassembled and properly works!

Two Girls at Harshman

Finally, then the hard work begins as each team reassembles their computer and presents the reassembled computer to Ms. Lettofsky to make certain that it was correctly reassembled and properly works! Now for some of the students, here’s the best part!

Hands at Harshman

Students whose family doesn’t have a computer at home gets to take the computer they just reassembled (together with a monitor, mouse, keyboard, and cables) home! Students can now use their computer for homework and learning. This is very important because students with a computer at home are 7% more likely to graduate from high school.

Quotes:

“It’s fun!” – J. D.

“I couldn’t believe it when my computer worked! I didn’t think I could do it.” – J. G.

“He’s been talking about this all week! He hasn’t been this excited about school for years!” – Grandfather of R. S.

“I really love seeing the kids go from ‘I can’t’ or ‘This is too hard” to ‘Look what I did!!’ It’s a real confidence booster!” – Ms. Lettofsky

Click on the link letters to Net Lit to read the students’ thank you notes to us!

Net Literacy congratulates Harshman Middle School and Ms. Caren Lettofsky for teaching in an innovative and engaging real world manner!

Net Literacy to Donate 1000 Computers to IPS Families Bringing Total to 18,000 Donated Computers!

Breaking news! Net Literacy will be finishing up 2015 by donating 1000 additional computers to the families of IPS students. This is important because the research shows that as an independent variable, a student with a computer at home is 6-8% more likely to graduate from high school. Check back in January and I’ll list the schools that received these computers. We are grateful that students at Shortridge Magnet High School are taking point on helping to make certain that the computers are distributed to students throughout the district.

Also in December, we plan to donate an additional 120 computers to public libraries throughout Indiana, increasing the total number of computers donated to the Indiana Library Association to almost 1000 computers!

For more information, contact me at danielkent(at)netliteracy.org