Gov.uk: A checklist for digital inclusion – if we do these things, we’re doing digital inclusion

checklist-for-digital-inclusion

Or visit this link directly: https://gds.blog.gov.uk/2014/01/13/a-checklist-for-digital-inclusion-if-we-do-these-things-were-doing-digital-inclusion/

As with most of our work at the Government Digital Service, we release things early for review and comment. The digital inclusion team, set up last year,would like to share and get your feedback on an alpha version of a checklist for digital inclusion.

We first mentioned a set of principles (we’re now calling it a checklist) when we published action 15 of the Government Digital Strategy. Over the last three months, this checklist has been developed in collaboration with partners from across government, private, voluntary and public sectors.

The intention is for the checklist to act as a guide for any organisation involved in helping people go online. In other words, if you do these things, you’re doing digital inclusion. Alongside each of the six checklist items, we have included an illustrative example of what works and a potential action that could be included in the upcoming digital inclusion strategy.

Checklist Overview

1.  Start with user needs – not our own
2.  Improve access – stop making things difficult
3.  Motivate people – find something they care about
4.  Keep it safe – build trust
5.  Work with others – don’t do it alone
6.  Focus on wider outcomes – measure performance

We want to hear from you

We are looking for feedback on the checklist from organisations and individuals who are involved in helping people, small businesses and small charities go online. We are keen to hear other examples from you  that illustrate great digital inclusion in action. We also want to know what actions we should be taking. Like those we have identified from the examples here, please let us know what you would do.

 

 

Throughout Africa – business analytics toolkit for tech hubs: lessons learned from infoDev’s mLabs and mHubs.

infodev

 

About infoDev:  infoDev is a multi-donor program in the World Bank Group that supports entrepreneurs in developing economies. We oversee a global network of business incubators and innovation hubs for climate technology, agribusiness, and digital entrepreneurs. We also publish educational resources on topics like crowdfunding, angel investing, and business incubator management.

Business analytics toolkit

The toolkit is especially useful for current and future mLab and mHub managers. mLabs and mHubs are tech hubs established through grants administered by the infoDev Digital Entrepreneurship Program infoDev is committed to supporting the analytical capacities of mLabs and mHubs. This toolkit is part of that agenda. It will help grantees to improve local implementation while setting a common framework on how to collaborate with infoDev on business analytics and performance measurements.

The third target audience is mobile innovation specialists at other World Bank units and other development organizations, who design impact and measurement frameworks for tech hubs. Given the recent rise in numbers of tech hubs, international development organizations are exploring if and how they can be employed to achieve socio-economic development impact goals. In particular, tech hubs’ flexibility and diverse potential effects have sparked interest but have also caused problems for specific and concrete analysis and projection of hubs’ effects and impact. This toolkit addresses this complication. All elements of the toolkit that speak of infoDev’s role in facilitating and coordinating with mLabs or mHubs on business analytics processes can be seen as use cases with potential for replication and adaptation by practitioners and decision makers of other development organizations, including relevant units of the World Bank.

What led infoDev to develop this Toolkit?

Tech hub numbers are burgeoning in developing countries, helping information and communication technology (ICT) developers and entrepreneurs to network, innovate, and start businesses. Set foot into a top-tier hub and you will be struck by the buzz and excitement that have infused local entrepreneurial communities within just a few years.

infoDev was at the forefront of the movement when, in 2011, it launched two different kinds of tech hubs to enable entrepreneurship in local mobile application and software markets: mobile application labs (mLabs) and mobile social networking hubs (mHubs). mLabs and mHubs were pilot mobile innovation support programs. The immediate goal was to help infoDev learn from experimentation how the innovation pioneer gap could be bridged through tech hubs. infoDev has since made great strides learning lessons, making evaluations and publishing knowledge products. Each mLab and mHub operated on different business models tailored to the needs of local markets, which increased the number of real-world experiments that infoDev could learn from.

This Business Analytics Toolkit will help you:

1)      Understand how to conduct performance measurement for an mLab or mHub, or other tech hubs

2)      Improve your planning, lesson learning, and delivery over time

3)      Collect data needed to communicate to potential investors and partners.

The Toolkit:

  • Is oriented towards tech hub managers but is also useful for others interested in the design of tech hubs
  • Provides a brief description of what led infoDev to put together this toolkit
  • Makes the case for the relevance of rigorous business analytics
  • Categorizes tech hub business models and outlines the consequences of business model selection for business analytics strategies
  • Highlights important considerations for tech hubs that are funded by governments and donors, including international development organizations such as infoDev
  • Gives detailed guidance on how a good business analytics approach can be developed and indicators selected in a performance measurement system
  • Provides instructions on how tech hubs can use business analytics and performance measurement in a continuous process
  • Briefly outlines how mLabs and mHubs can engage with infoDev once they have a sound business analytics approach in place

This is version 1.0 of this toolkit, and you are encouraged to help improve future versions by submitting your feedback to infoDev.

 

 

 

 

 

Google and iKeepSafe team up to develop curriculum that educators can use in the classroom to teach what it means to be a responsible digital citizen.

google-and-ikeepsafe

 

iKeepSafe is dedicated to the education of families on how to stay safe online. That’s why we’ve teamed up with Google to develop curriculum that educators can use in the classroom to teach what it means to be a responsible digital citizen.

The curriculum is designed to be interactive, discussion filled and allow students to learn through hands-on and scenario activities. Each workshop contains a resource booklet for both educators and students that can be downloaded in PDF form, presentations to accompany the lesson and animated videos to help frame the conversation.

Class 1: Become an Online Sleuth

Class 2: Manage Your Digital Reputation

ConnectSafely.org is a world class nonprofit dedicated to educating users of connected technology about safety, privacy and security.

connect-safely-best-practices

ConnectSafely.org is a Silicon Valley, Calif.-based nonprofit organization dedicated to educating users of connected technology about safety, privacy and security. Here you’ll find research-based safety tips, parents’ guidebooks, advice, news and commentary on all aspects of tech use and policy.

Whether it’s social media, mobile technology or the “Internet of Things,” connected technologies bring us enormous advantages, along with some challenges. ConnectSafely’s job is to help users get the most from their technology while managing the risks and help decision makers craft sensible policies that encourage both innovation and responsible use. ConnectSafely has been a leading voice for rational, research-informed policies — not “moral panics” — when it comes to dealing with challenges brought about by emerging technologies.

Connect Safely is the U.S. host of Safer Internet Day, a global celebration that takes place on the second Tuesday of each February, and founders of the One Good Thing campaign to surface and celebrate the many ways people of all ages and cultures use connected technology to make the world a better place.

ConnectSafely.org was founded in 2005 by technology journalist Larry Magid, also founder of SafeKids.com, and Anne Collier of NetFamilyNews.

Some of our favorite parts of this site are:

Check it out!  This is a world class safety, privacy, and security site and Larry Magid is one of the leading and most respected international experts on safety.

connect-safely

Eskenazi Health’s Donations Helps Increase High School Graduation Rates

Eskenazi Health donated the first 50 of as many as 1000 17″ LCD monitors to Net Literacy today, continuing their long standing program of giving back to the communities that they serve.

“Eskenazi Health’s donation makes a real difference to students and their families,” said Daniel Kent, founder of Net Literacy. “As an independent variable, students with a computer at home are 7% more likely to graduate from high school. Because we have more computers to donate than monitors, Eskenazi Health’s generous donation will enable us to provide increased technology to the homes of up to 1000 K12 families, and according to the statistics, more than 70 additional students may graduate from high school.” Net Literacy also donates computers to afterschool providers, public libraries, community centers, and other nonprofits. “Thank you Eskenazi Health,” Kent continued, “for being such an amazing community partner!”

Eskenazi Health is a leading A leading health care provider in central Indiana, and offers a wide range of services at their 315-bed Indianapolis hospital and 10 community health centers. For more information, visit www.eskenazihealth.edu/

Net Literacy is a digital inclusion and digital literacy nonprofit founded by middle school students in 2003 and has donated 39,000 computers to Hoosiers and nonprofits throughout the Midwest. For more information, visit www.netliteracy.org/about-us.

Net Literacy Donates 890 Computers to 100 Indiana Libraries

Net Literacy was conceived of by a middle school student who was volunteering at a public library teaching elementary school students and senior citizens computer and Internet skills in 2003. Net Literacy’s first training guides and lesson plans were adapted from materials that were donated by the research librarian. Fourteen years later, Net Literacy continues to say “thank you” by giving back to public libraries since they were involved in its genesis, and supports the impact that public libraries play in increasing access to technology and digital literacy throughout Indiana. In total, Net Literacy has donated 890 computers (and monitors, keyboards, mice, and power cords) to the Indiana Library Association who coordinates their distribution across Indiana.

Since its inception, Net Literacy has donated over 39,000 computers to K12 families, community centers, libraries, senior centers, schools, and other nonprofits. K12 students that have a computer at home are 7% more likely to graduate from high school. Net Literacy has used a two prong strategy to maximize access to computers – by donating to schools whose student counselors give the computers to underserved and high need families and to nonprofits so that they can construct, expand, or refresh public computer labs. One of Net Literacy’s initiatives has constructed 135 computer labs in schools, churches, and community centers within the Indianapolis area.

Maricopa County Librarian Scott Sjolin Teaches Digital Literacy Using Net Literacy Lesson Plans

March 2016

Scott Sjolin is the Librarian at Queen Creek Branch of Maricopa County Library District, and he reached out to us asking to use Net Literacy’s lessons plans to teach computer and Internet skills. So far, he has taught three classes using the Computer Basics Lesson Plan, the Internet Basics Lesson Plan, and the Email Basics Lesson Plan – and tells us that the printed lesson plans help instruction process and that the adults he taught appreciated the lesson plans that he provided to each student. He sent us a couple pictures of him in action teaching classes. In behalf of Net Literacy, thanks Scott for teaching computer skills and increasing digital literacy!

Net Literacy, the Mary Riggs Community Center, and IPS Work to Donate an Additional 1050 Computers

Net Literacy, Mary Riggs Community Center, and IPS are working to distribute computers repurposed at Broad Ripple Magnet High School to the families of K12 IPS students and to afterschool programs that support IPS.

“Liz Odel,” said Daniel Kent, “has been leading the charge in facilitating the distribution of computers to dozens of IPS schools.” According to Kent, IPS families have received more than 200 computers last month and 100 have been staged to be transported by IPS Transportation to North West High School. In total, IPS families and afterschool programs have received more than 18,000 computers.

“I’m really pleased that we are able to donate higher end computers to the K12 families,” Kent said. “All of the PCs are dual core machines with 2 to 4 Gig of Ram. They have plenty of horsepower for students to use them to complete their homework Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, and PowerPoint presentations.” Included on the computers is Open Office, and other applications that help students take advantage of their computers for school work.

For more information, email me at danielkent(at)netliteracy.org

Net Literacy Donates 750 Computers to Almost 100 Indiana Public Libraries

Net Literacy was conceived of by a middle school student who was volunteering at a public library teaching elementary school students and senior citizens computer and Internet skills in 2003. Net Literacy’s first training guides and lesson plans were adapted from materials that were donated by the research librarian. Fourteen years later, Net Literacy continues to say “thank you” by giving back to public libraries since they were involved in its genesis, and supports the impact that public libraries play in increasing access to technology and digital literacy throughout Indiana. The picture below is one of me sitting on some of the computers that the Indiana Library Association recently picked up. In total, Net Literacy has donated 750 computers (and monitors, keyboards, mice, and power cords) to the Indiana Library Association who coordinates their distribution across Indiana.

Since its inception, Net Literacy has donated almost 35,000 computers to K12 families, community centers, libraries, senior centers, schools, and other nonprofits. K12 students that have a computer at home are 7% more likely to graduate from high school. Net Literacy has used a two prong strategy to maximize access to computers – by donating to schools whose student counselors give the computers to underserved and high need families and to nonprofits so that they can construct, expand, or refresh public computer labs. One of Net Literacy’s initiatives has constructed 135 computer labs in schools, churches, and community centers within the Indianapolis area.

Dan in warehouse

For more information, contact Daniel Kent at danielkent(at)netliteracy.org

Harshman Middle School Uses Net Literacy Computers to Make STEM Learning Real World and Relevant!

Students in Ms. Caren Lettofsky’s computer science classes, at Indianapolis Public School’s Harshman Middle School, learn about computers by reassemble their own computer.

Ms Lettofsky

First, Ms. Lettofsky first has the students build a virtual computer, using a website created by Cisco. This site walks students through various steps to build a desktop computer. This part of the website gives hints and guidance as to what to do. Once the students has completed this part of the website, the students then move to the next phase of the website and build the computer without any added help. Ms. Lettofsky also has the students complete a worksheet where the students must explain, in their own words, what the various parts of a computer does.

Virtual Computer Assembly Application

Learning then becomes very real for the students. Students, in teams of two, work on computers provided by Net Literacy. First, each team completely disassembles the computer. Then the hard work begins as each team reassembles their computer.

Two students at Harshman

When each team believes they have reassembled the computer correctly, the team presents the reassembled computer to Ms. Lettofsky. The computer is then connected to a keyboard, mouse, and monitor and powered on to make certain that it was correctly reassembled and properly works!

Two Girls at Harshman

Finally, then the hard work begins as each team reassembles their computer and presents the reassembled computer to Ms. Lettofsky to make certain that it was correctly reassembled and properly works! Now for some of the students, here’s the best part!

Hands at Harshman

Students whose family doesn’t have a computer at home gets to take the computer they just reassembled (together with a monitor, mouse, keyboard, and cables) home! Students can now use their computer for homework and learning. This is very important because students with a computer at home are 7% more likely to graduate from high school.

Quotes:

“It’s fun!” – J. D.

“I couldn’t believe it when my computer worked! I didn’t think I could do it.” – J. G.

“He’s been talking about this all week! He hasn’t been this excited about school for years!” – Grandfather of R. S.

“I really love seeing the kids go from ‘I can’t’ or ‘This is too hard” to ‘Look what I did!!’ It’s a real confidence booster!” – Ms. Lettofsky

Click on the link letters to Net Lit to read the students’ thank you notes to us!

Net Literacy congratulates Harshman Middle School and Ms. Caren Lettofsky for teaching in an innovative and engaging real world manner!